Roi Et | Thailand

Roi Et (Thai: ร้อยเอ็ด, pronounced [rɔ́ːj ʔèt]) is a town (thesaban mueang) in north-eastern Thailand, capital of Roi Et Province. It covers the whole tambon Nai Mueang of Mueang Roi Et district. As of 2006 it had a population of 34,229. Roi Et is 514 km from Bangkok.

The name of the province literally means "one hundred and one" (ร้อยเอ็ด roi et). Correctly, the number should be "eleven" (สิบเอ็ด sip et), as the province was named after its eleven ancient gates built for its eleven vassal states. In olden times, the number "eleven" was written "๑๐๑" (101) and the province name was so written. Later, people misunderstood that "๑๐๑" was "one hundred and one" and have since incorrectly called it Roi Et.

Kalasin (Thai: กาฬสินธุ์, pronounced [kāːlāsǐn]) is one of the northeast (Isan) provinces (changwat) of Thailand. The province was established by the Act Establishing Changwat Kalasin, BE 2490 (1947), and it came into existence on 1 October 1947.

Neighboring provinces are (from north clockwise) Sakon Nakhon, Mukdahan, Roi Et, Maha Sarakham, Khon Kaen, and Udon Thani.

Most of the province is covered by hilly landscape. The town of Kalasin is at an elevation of 152 m. In the north is the Lam Pao Dam built from 1963-1968. It stores 1,430 million m³ of water for flood prevention and agriculture. The Lam Pao reservoir effectively cuts the northern part of the province in half, but there are car ferries connecting the district of Sahatsakhan in the east with the district Nong Kung Si in the west, saving up to one hour off the journey by road. On the northwestern creek of the reservoir a road bridge connects the village of Ban Dong Bang in the west with the district town of Wang Sam Mo in the east. Although the bridge was constructed several years ago (pre-2000) it is not featured (2006) on any commercially available road maps.

The Phu Phan mountain range marks the border with Sakhon Nakhon Province, part of which is preserved as a national park.

Kalasin is famous for the dinosaur fossils found at Phu Kum Khao (Sahatsakhan District), the largest dinosaur site in Thailand. Most of the fossils are sauropods from 120 million years ago.

Sisaket (Thai: ศรีสะเกษ, RTGS: Si Sa Ket), is one of the northeastern provinces (changwat) of Thailand. Neighboring provinces are (from west clockwise) Surin, Roi Et, Yasothon, and Ubon Ratchathani. To the south it borders Oddar Meancheay and Preah Vihear of Cambodia.

The many Khmer ruins found in the province show the area must have been important to the Khmer empire at least by the 12th century, although it was apparently sparsely populated. According to local tradition, it was known as Sri Nakorn Lamduan (ศรีนครลำดวน.) It was later called Khukhan, after a town built in the late 15th century CE during the reign of King Boromaratcha III of Ayutthaya. Ethnic Laos began settling the northern portion of the province, and in 1786 the town Sisaket was formed, subject to Khukhan. In 1904, Sisaket was renamed Khukhan, while the original Khukhan was designated Huai Nua. Monthon Udon Thani was created in 1912, and assumed the administration of the most of region. In 1933 the monthon system was ended, and the province of Khukhan was administered directly from Bangkok. Five years later, the name of the town and province were restored to Sisaket, with the district containing Huai Nua being called Khukhan. (Thai: ศรี transcribed Sri in Sri Nakorn Lamduan and Si in Sisaket is the Thai honorific Si/Sri).
Rasi Salai Dam

The Rasi Salai Dam built here in 1994 was unofficially decommissioned in July 2000, following devastation of local farming villages.

Yasothon (Thai: ยโสธร, pronounced [já.sǒː.tʰɔ̄ːn]) is a province (changwat) of Thailand, in the northeast on the Chi River. The province was established by the revolutionary council of Field Marshal Thanom Kittikachorn, after its Announcement No. 70 which came into force on 3 March 1972.

Neighboring provinces are (from north clockwise) Mukdahan, Amnat Charoen, Ubon Ratchathani, Sisaket, and Roi Et.

Yasothon is about 500 km (310 mi) from Bangkok at the intersection of Highways of Thailand Routes 23 and 202, and the southern end of Route 2169. Pedicabs serve the city. Tuk-tuks are prohibited. Motorcycle taxis with yellow license plates and drivers with identifying vests serve outlying areas and may take passengers about within the city limits. Several bus lines connect daily and at frequent intervals to Bangkok's Northern Bus Terminal (often called Mo Chit Mai หมอชิดใหม่) and the North Pattaya Terminal, as well as all bus terminals in the north and northeast. Train and air services connect Bangkok to Ubon Ratchathani Province, 100 kilometres east on Route 23. Yasothon's bus terminal re-located from the city centre to the Route 23 Bypass just east of the Ban Kham Noi Junction with Vittaya Thamrong Road/Rural Road YS-2018.

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